Philippines- A Golden Heritage

Note: This article was originally compiled and published on vedicempire.com in 2010. Due to it’s being compiled from various sources, some going back to the 1800s, not all the information is accurate. However the overall conclusion confirming the prehistoric Vedic foundations of Philippine Civilization are undeniable. Long discredited and minimized as an uncivilized backwater, the islands now known as the Philippines, were in fact the epicenter of High Civilization. Sanskrit, the Vedic Traditions and Deities were indigenous throughout the archipelago. It is no exaggeration to call them the ‘Golden Isles’ for it once was home to a vast network of Gold mining, crafting and trade.

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When the Philippines drafted its Constitution, it placed the statue of Manu in the Assembly Hall with this inscription on its base: “The first, the greatest and the wisest law-giver of mankind.” Researches into the racial and cultural origins of the Philippines increasingly prove that it was colonized by some people in South India. In fact, the script of the Filipinos has some obvious similarities with that of South India. “Our dialects belong to the Dravidian family.” says Justice Romualdez. “The names of some places on the shores of Manila Bay and the coast of Luzon show their Sanskrit origin.”

Source: Pre-Colonial Philippines
Collection by Jacob Walse-Dominguez·
Pre-Colonial Indic Philippine Culture (clothing, dance, etc)

Indian influence is most patent in handicrafts and the old names of coins used there. Many social customs current there show a likeness to the Indian ones. Saleeby says, “The head-gods of the Indian Triad and the earliest Vedic gods had the foremost place in the minds and devotion of the hill-tribes of Luzon and Mindanao. A Ganesha statue too was found there. Indeed as Beyer says, “India has most profoundly affected the Philippine civilization.” 

Even the national flower of Philippines is the Indian Champaka. The Indian influence on Philippines is explicable by the fact that it was that it was for 150 years a colony of a Java-based Hindu Empire of Sri Vijaya. (source: The Soul of India – By Satyavrata R Patel p. 30).

Indigenous Filipino Vedic Ceremony

“It is impossible to believe that the Hindus, if they came only as merchants, however great their number, would have impressed themselves in such a way as to give to these islanders, the Philippines, the number and the kind of words, which they did give. These names of dignitaries, of caciques, of high functionaries of the court, of noble ladies, indicate that these high positions, with names of Sanskrit origin, were occupied at one time by men, who spoke that language. The words of similar origin, for objects of war, fortresses and battle songs, for designating objects of religious beliefs, for superstitions, emotions, feelings, industrial and farming activities, show us clearly that the warfare, religion, literature, industry and agriculture were at once time in the hands of the Hindus and that this race was effectively dominant in the Philippines.” (source: El Sanscrito en la langua Tagalag – T H Pardo de Tavera Paris 1887; The Philippines and India – Dhirendra Nath Roy Manila 1929 and India and The World – By Buddha Prakash p. 119-120).

Source: 10 Reasons Why Life Was Better In Pre-Colonial Philippines

In the early stages of this lecture, I have already referred to the Iron age finds in the Philippines bearing close resemblance to objects found in South India about the same period, more than a thousand years before Christ, and also to other evidences of trade contact with Malaya, Indo-China North Borneo and Philippines in those remote times. The Spanish who dominated the Philippines in recent centuries are not likely to have preserved religious and cultural antiquities of other faiths.


Source: Pre-Colonial Philippines
Collection by Jacob Walse-Dominguez·
Pre-Colonial Indic Philippine Culture (clothing, dance, etc)

In 1820, however, a copper image of Siva was discovered in one of those islands which points to a remote period in which the worship of Siva had been introduced by South Indian merchants.

That these facts are by no means unsupported by other evidence may be shown by the remarks made by Mr. Phiroz Kutar, Technical Director, which were reported in the Madras ‘Hindu’ (October 1954):

“Researches into the cultural and racial origins of the people of Ceylon and of countries lying eastward have shown that they were once colonised from South India and in particular the Filipino script has striking similarities with that of Tamilark. These researches have also shown that Filipino dialects belonged to the Dravidian family.”   

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Glittering Evidence    

By Ric Vil Hori

Here is a shining, and literally so, presentation produced by the Probe Team, a local video documentary show, entitled Gintong Pamana (Golden Heritage) about the discovery of excellent gold artifacts and jewelries dating from 10th to 13th century in Surigao, Mindanao island, in what could be one of the most important, tangible heritage not just of this country, which for decades had been groping in the dark as to the legacies of pre-colonial history, but in Asia as well that could rewrite history like never before.

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Gold Sacred Brahmin Thread

This may also be the a glittering evidence mentioned from my previous blog, of spices and empires, that indeed this nation was once a place renowned in the ancient times for its unusual abundance of gold mentioned from the account of ancient Greeks (known as Chryse, the Golden One), Indians (Suvarnadvipa, Islands of Gold), Chinese (Chin-chou , Isle of Gold, Lusung Dao or “Luzon daw”), and even in biblical account to the court of King Solomon (Ophir)!

Even the Spanish historian who sailed with Magellan’s expedition, Pigafetta, exclaimed that gold in the islands were so abundant that just a simple dig could produce gold nuggets the size of walnuts.

The sudden disappearance of such treasures upon the arrival of colonizers were enigmatic, but the discovery of the Surigao gold artifacts provided clue that unlike ancient mainstream practices, the natives of these islands buried their gold even when the owners were yet alive (and in connection with previous discussions, sought the aid of their anitos or Elemental deities for safeguarding of such treasures from vile agendas, a practice that mainstream “modern” paradigms exacerbated by bigotry may not comprehend as to the reality it once held in the lives of these ancient, prosperous ancestors).

The whole documentary is generally presented in the local language, Tagalog. Even for foreigners who may not understand the tongue, witnessing the sheer excellence, intricate craftsmanship, priceless historical value, almost ethereal quality of the ancient golden artifacts may still leave anybody speechless.

WATCH GOLDEN HERITAGE

HINDUISM IN THE ANCIENT PHILIPPINES

Vedic Philippines: 900 AD – Earliest known Calendar-Dated Filipino Document

Note: I published this on the old vedicempire.com back in 2010 with another article entitled ‘Philippines- A Golden Heritage‘. Inspired research of Native Filipino scholars and activists has revealed a tremendous historical past. Rather than an illiterate isolated island group, the ancient Philippine Civilizations were in fact highly cultured, literate and part of a vast trade network spanning half the globe.

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It is the earliest known calendar-dated document used within the Philippine Islands.[1]

Kasulatang tansong natagpuan sa Laguna

A document was found in 1989 that was written in a much older and more complex writing system ever seen in the Philippines before.

On that day in 1989, a man in the concrete business was dredging sand at the mouth of the Lumbang River near Laguna de Ba’y when he uncovered a blackened roll of metal. Usually he would just throw away such junk, as it tended to get jammed in his equipment, but when he unfurled the roll he saw that it was a sheet of copper with strange writing on it, about the size of a magazine.

He offered the copper sheet to one of the antiques dealers in the area who bought it for next to nothing. The dealer, in turn, tried to sell it for a profit but when he found no buyers, he eventually sold it to the Philippine National Museum for just 2000 pesos.

In 1990, Antoon Postma, a Dutch expert in ancient Philippine scripts and Mangyan writing, and a long-time resident of the Philippines, translated the document that came to be known as the Laguna Copperplate Inscription (LCI). When he saw that the writing looked similar to the ancient Indonesian script called Kavi, and that the document bore a date from the ancient Sanskrit calendar, he enlisted the help of fellow Dutchman, Dr. Johann de Casparis, whose area of expertise was ancient Indonesia.

Casparis confirmed that the script and the words used in the Laguna document were exactly the same as those that were used on the island Java at the time stated in the document, which was the year 822, in the old Hindu calendar or the year 900 C.E. (Common Era) on our calendar.

In 1996, a Filipino history buff in California, Hector Santos, precisely converted the Sanskrit date over to our calendar by using astronomical software and some historical detective work. He determined that the Sanskrit date written on the plate was exactly Monday, April 21, 900 C.E.

swasti shaka warsatita 822 waisakha masa di(ng) jyotisa.

caturthi kresnapaksa somawara sana tatkala dayang angkatan lawan dengan ña sanak barngaran si bukah anak da dang hwan namwaran dibari waradana wi shuddhapattra ulih sang pamegat senapati di tundun barja(di) dang hwan nayaka tuhan pailah jayadewa.

di krama dang hwan namwaran dengan dang kayastha shuddha nu diparlappas hutang da walenda kati 1 suwarna 8 dihadapan dang huwan nayaka tuhan puliran kasumuran.

dang hwan nayaka tuhan pailah barjadi ganashakti. dang hwan nayaka tuhan binwangan barjadi bishruta tathapi sadana sanak kapawaris ulih sang pamegat dewata [ba]rjadi sang pamegat medang dari bhaktinda diparhulun sang pamegat. ya makaña sadaña anak cucu dang hwan namwaran shuddha ya kapawaris dihutang da dang hwan namwaran di sang pamegat dewata.

ini grang syat syapanta ha pashkat ding ari kamudyan ada grang urang barujara welung lappas hutang da dang hwa

From Laguna Copperplate Inscription Wikipedia

The plate was found in 1989 by a labourer near the mouth of the Lumbang River in Wawa, LumbanLaguna in the Philippines. The inscription was written in Old Malay using the Kawi script with Sanskrit and Old Javanese influences. 

The Laguna Copperplate Inscription, among other recent finds such as the Golden Tara of Butuan and 14th century pottery and gold jewellery in Cebu, is highly important in revising ancient Philippine history, which was until then considered by some Western historians to be culturally isolated from the rest of Asia, as no evident pre-Hispanic written records were found at the time.

The inscription is a document demonstrative of pre-Hispanic literacy and culture, and is considered to be a national treasure. It is currently deposited at the National Museum of Anthropology in Manila.[25]